Enterprise Architecture and the Success of Ambitious Endeavors

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Leonard Fehskens. Chief Editor, Journal of Enterprise Architecture, Association of Enterprise Architects

Enterprise Architecture and the Success of Ambitious Endeavors

Leonard Fehskens. Chief Editor, Journal of Enterprise Architecture, Association of Enterprise Architects

Large projects (for example the Affordable Care Act website rollout, or Boston's Big Dig) can fail in embarrassing, expensive and disruptive ways. Project and program planning and management are mature disciplines;  why then does this happen as often as it does?  The answer is so simple as to be easily dismissed as trivial -- projects that fail didn't do everything they needed to do to be successful.  If they had, they would have, by definition, been successful.

We dismiss this insight as trivial at our peril.  It suggests that what we need is a concept of architecture that is "success-centric", i.e., that enables us to be confident that we are in fact doing everything that is necessary to be successful, and ideally, little else that is not essential to success.

What would such a concept of architecture look like, and what does the idea of "success-centric" architecture imply for enterprise architecture?

This talk explores and develops these ideas and proposes concepts of enterprise and architecture that might be better suited to ambitious endeavors than those in common use today.

Key takeaways:

  • How errors of omission can be more serious than errors of commission
  • Why we overlook things essential to success
  • The relationship between architecture and design.

Len Fehskens is responsible for Association of Enterprise Architects’ activities relating to the professionalization of the discipline of enterprise architecture.  He is currently the Chief Editor of the Journal of Enterprise Architecture.  He is also the VP of Skills and Capabilities for The Open Group.

Prior to joining The Open Group, Len led the Worldwide Architecture Profession Office for HP Services at Hewlett-Packard. He majored in Computer Science at MIT, and has over 45 years of experience as both an individual contributor and a manager, within both product engineering and services business units.

Len has worked for Digital Equipment Corporation, Data General Corporation, Prime Computer, Compaq and Hewlett Packard.  He is the lead inventor on six software patents on the object oriented management of distributed systems.

 

 

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